Safari Tours

Safari Tours

ROAD TRIPS FROM MOMBASA ARE AS FOLLOWS:

-½  DAY CITY TOUR –MOMBASA (visiting Old Town and the Fort Jesus)
COST PER PERSON – 50 US Dollars

-FULL DAYS CITY TOUR-MOMBASA(visiting,Akamba Hand Craft,Fort Jesus,The Old
Town,The Spice Market ,Temple,-After lunch to Haller park on time for
FEEDING)

COST PER PERSON – 90 US Dollars
***the price includes:lunches but IT DOES NOT include the entrance fees
for the major place of view like Fort Jesus and Haller Park).

1 DAY TRIP TO TSAVO EAST

2 people – 400 US Dollars
3 people – 495 US Dollars
4 people – 595 US Dollars
6 people – 780 US Dollars

2 DAYS  TSAVO EAST ONLY

2 people – 700 US Dollars
3 people – 850 US Dollars
4 people – 1080 US Dollars
6 people – 1420 US Dollars

3 DAYS TSAVO EAST AND AMBOSELI

2 people – 1310 US Dollars
3 people – 1620 US Dollars
4 people – 2025 US Dollars
6 people – 2800 US Dollars

 

2 DAYS TSAVO EAST AND TSAVO WEST

2 people – 900 US Dollars
3 people – 1150 US Dollars
4 people – 1450 US Dollars
6 people – 1930 US Dollars

 

3 DAYS TSAVO EAST AND TSAVO WEST

2 people – 1300 US Dollars
3 people – 1495 US Dollars
4 people – 1650 US Dollars
6 people – 2560 US Dollars

3 DAYS MASAI MARA FROM MOMBASA IS ONLY BY AIR(FLIGHT)

COST IS PER PERSON (P.P)
Accommodation at Governors camp  1400 US Dollars
Accommodation at Kichakani camp 960 US Dollars
Accommodation at Ol Mara camp 980 US Dollars
Accommodation at Fig Tree camp 990 US Dollars

The prices are for the number of people together in a safari van.

Price includes:
-parkfees
-accommodations fullboard
-water in the van
-transport
-any other park charges

Not included in the Price:
-drivers allowances
-stuff of personal nature(cigarettes,alcohol)

Accommodations applicable during the safaris are as follows:
-Tsavo East – Voi Safari Lodge/Voi Wildlife Lodge-Tent
-Tsavo West – Ngulia Safari Lodge
-Amboseli – Kibo Safari Camp/ Sentrim Safari Camp
– Masai Mara – Ol Mara Camp / Kichakani Camp

We offer other many various safari…which will suit your
desires(Tailor-made-safaris).

To read much about Tsavo National Park (East and West)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tsavo_National_Park

 >>>>>>>>>>MOMBASA<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<

Kenya’s second city can come as a revelation. There’s a depth of history here, and a sense of community Nairobi lacks. And, whereas Nairobi has very clear boundaries between rich and poor districts, things are less clearly defined in Mombasa. Sleazy, hot – you’re always thirsty – and physically tropical in a way that could hardly be more different from the capital, MOMBASA is the slightly indolent hub of the coast – a faded, flaking, occasionally charming city that still feels, despite its gentle sprawl, like a small town that was once great.

Mombasa is actually an island, connected to the mainland by two causeways to the west, and by a bridge to the north, but still linked only by ferry to the south. The city is intricate and its streets wriggle deceptively. At its appealing heart is the Old Town, a lattice of lanes, mosques and cramped, old houses sloping gently down to the once-busy dhow harbour. Fort Jesus, an impressive reminder of Mombasa’s complicated, bloody past, still overlooks the Old Town from where it once guarded the harbour entrance. It’s now a national monument and museum.

Clustered all around you, within easy walking distance, is the whole expanse of downtown, modern Mombasa, with its wide streets and refreshing lack of high-rise buildings (though their number is steadily growing). While you won’t doubt it’s a chaotic city, the atmosphere, even in the commercial centre of one of Africa’s busiest ports, is invariably relaxed and congenial. Rush hours, urgency and paranoia seem to be Nairobi’s problems (as everyone here will tell you), not Mombasa’s. And the gaping, marginal slums that one expects to find outside African cities hardly exist here. True, Likoni and especially Changamwe, on the mainland, are burgeoning suburbs that the municipality has more or less abandoned, but the brutalizing conditions of the Mathare Valley, Kibera and Korogocho shantytowns in Nairobi are absent.

Despite the palms, the sunshine and the happy languor, all is not bliss and perfection. Street crime, though it hardly approaches Nairobi’s level, is still a problem, and you should be wary of displaying your valuables or accepting invitations to walk down dark alleys. The Likoni ferry and the area around the junction of Jomo Kenyatta Avenue with Mwembe Tayeri Road are two hotspots for pickpocketing and bag snatching, and it is not unknown for gangs of pickpockets to stalk tourists along Moi Avenue and around Fort Jesus. But, as a general rule, Mombasa is a far less neurotic city than Nairobi and, in stark contrast to the capital, there’s nowhere in the centre that could be considered a no-go area. One indication of this is that the city stays awake much later. Climatic considerations may partly explain it but, at an hour when central Nairobi is empty but for taxis and askaris, Mombasans are to be seen strolling in the warm night, old men conversing on the benches in Digo Road, and many shops are still open. The small-town freedoms remain healthy here and it all adds up to a city that is richly satisfying and rewarding to stay in.

Ethnically, Mombasa is perhaps even more diverse than Nairobi. Asian and Arab influence is particularly pervasive, with fifty mosques and dozens of Hindu and Sikh temples lending a strongly Oriental flavour. Still, the largest contingent speaks Swahili as a first language and it is the Swahili civilization that, more than any other, accounts for Mombasa’s distinctive character. You’ll see women wearing head-to-foot buibuis or brilliant kanga outfits, men decked out in kanzu gowns and hip-slung kikoi wraps. The smaller community of white settlers and expatriates figures less prominently here than in Nairobi, but it continues to wield disproportionate economic and social clout.

As a tourist town, Mombasa doesn’t go out of its way to please. Indeed, one of its best qualities is its utter lack of pretension. It is principally a port: Kilindini harbour takes up most of the western side of the island. Increasingly, too, Mombasa is an industrial city, boasting one of East Africa’s major oil refineries (on your right as you arrive by train). In short, Mombasa is not a resort. Visiting sailors are as important to its tourist economy as bona fide tourists, and (a grievous shortcoming) the island has no real beaches. The vast majority of the obvious tourists that you’ll see around the place are here only for the purpose of a shopping trip from their North or South coast beach hotels-Mombasa is a historical city, while best beaches are North and South of the island. You may not be able to resist the lure of the beaches for too long, but Mombasa deserves a little of your time unless you are in a big hurry; there are few places in the country with such a strong sense of identity.